Monthly Archives: November 2014

The Roadtrip Part One

P1000524One of the best things about living in Melbourne is the location. I know I complained about the location when I first moved here because it was the main reason for the bad weather, but there are so many things on Melbourne’s doorstep that makes the location actually fantastic.

The Great Ocean Road is a 243 kilometre stretch of road which runs from Torquay to Allansford along one of the most scenic stretches of coastal road in the world. The first time my travels led me there was in December 2013 during my roadtrip with Erin. We began at Warnambool, which is often cited as the start of the Great Ocean Road. Unfortunately, I was incredibly ill during that first trip and was therefore unable to enjoy it as much as we could. Due to my illness, we made haste on the journey so that we could get to Ballarat where a good nights’ sleep awaited me.

My second visit to the Great Ocean Road was, however, very different. I’m not sure who first had the idea, but it was certainly struck upon that we needed to hire a camper van and go on a roadtrip for a few days while we had a little break in our workload and before 3 of our group went off on their next adventure. Stefani found a great company called Wicked Campers who have vans that have been painted with various slogans and spray paint, with tents added to the top, tables added to the inside and a kitchen at the back. Stefani was also hard at work planning the route for our trip which would take us all along the Great Ocean Road and then perhaps on to South Australia or further North into rural Victoria.P1000517

One Monday morning, on a bright October day, with an assortment of bags and Eskies, the five of us showed up to collect our camper van. The van, an old Toyota, was decorated with an array of colours and peace signs, bearing the slogan ‘Hippy Freaks’ on one side, with ‘Smelly Hippies’ on the other. This was to be our home for the next four days. We were given brief instructions on how to erect the tent on top of the van, told where the nearest petrol station was and we were off.P1000530

The first part of our journey was spent getting to the Great Ocean Road from Melbourne, which was about an hour and a half to Torquay. Once there, we were able to really begin exploring.

There are so many coves and beaches which run all along the coast of Victoria. We ventured on to one such beach and were mesmerised by the beauty of the rock formations; caves and cobbles and beach for miles to see. Dayna decided that wading through the sea to get round a headland was a good idea, but was quickly thigh deep in water and the rest of us deigned not to follow.

P1000545Just outside of Lorne begin sign posts to Erskine Falls. We took a winding road up from coastal road and after twenty minutes we arrived in a car park surrounded by trees. The decent to the waterfall was steep and we were warned by those walking back up that though the sight that awaited us was stunning, the climb back to the top would be intense. We did have the thought of perhaps being able to swim in the waters beneath the fall but once we got to it, we realised this would not be possible. Not only was the water dark and dingy, but it was also freezing cold. However, we were able to explore and scramble over rocks – although on a return visit, I will remember to wear better shoes.

Our fellow tourists were not wrong when they told us the climb to the top would be difficult, but we persevered and got to the top, perhaps a little more sweaty than we would have liked.

We pushed on to Lorne, which was practically a ghost town compared to when I had previously been there during Falls Festival. The shops were quiet and we took our time looking around. My favourite stretch of the Great Ocean Road begins just out of Lorne and continues for the next 140 km; the most beautiful and breath-taking views I have ever seen. On a day like the one we had – bright and sunny – the views of the coastline extend for miles. The road winds in and out of rock face and bush, with houses suspended on stilts looking over the Bass Strait.P1000572

The sea was a little moody due to the wind but it was still the most brilliant blue colour and the contrast between it and the sandy coloured rocks made for many a perfect photo opportunity. We were able to stop at lookouts and marvel at what lay before us before clambering back into the van to continue the journey.

We began to think about where we would stay for the night and Dayna suggested using Wikicamps to find a cheap or free campsite where we could park our van and erect our quarters for the evening. The campsite we settled on was just on the way out of Apollo Bay and had a wonderful view over a river and farmland. It was $9 each for the night which was pretty good considering the facilities (shower and toilet), as well as the location.

The tent went up just as the guy we picked the van up from said it would and it was incredibly spacious inside; plenty of space for the five of us to sleep. Without much further ado, we created a nest for ourselves, got our goon and clambered into the tent. None of us really stopped to check the time and were therefore very surprised to find that it was barely 7pm and we were all feeling incredibly tired after our day of travelling. The wind picked up and we were glad of our shelter. After chatting for a few hours, we got into our sleeping bags. Needless to say, we were all asleep by 10pm.

Our first day was probably our busiest so the remaining days adventures will be up in The Roadtrip Part Two.

 

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